Category Marketing

It has never been more important for recruiters to perfect their “sales process” for identifying, nurturing, and hiring qualified talent.

Consider the current hiring environment: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the national unemployment rate in November 2016 was 4.6 percent –the lowest level seen since 2007. Employment is growing rapidly, especially in top industries like technology and healthcare, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’Occupational Outlook Handbook. And top candidates – if they’re even open to a new opportunity – know that they’re in demand and often have multiple offers to choose from.

For recruiters, this can be an exhausting and unforgiving landscape to navigate, especially if they don’t have the right resources and strategies in place to be productive. Leveraging many of the same techniques and tools that sales & marketing teams use to be successful can help. The idea that the work of a recruiter is very much akin to that of a salesperson is certainly not new. It’s a logical connection to make: Both need to identify qualified prospects, nurture them through a specific process, and eventually – hopefully – close the deal before the competition does.

By taking a page or two from sales playbooks, recruiters are likely to find it easier to source candidates, build a pipeline of talent, and hire faster. For example, recruiters should work to:

To request council membership, please contact Chris White

chris@viablemkts.com
646-258-4878

CHAIRMAN OF THE U.S. COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION FROM 2014-2017

 

Timothy Massad is currently a Senior Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown Law School.

Mr. Massad served as Chairman of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission from 2014-2017. Under his leadership, the agency implemented critical reforms of the over-the-counter swaps market; harmonized many aspects of cross-border regulation, including reaching a landmark agreement with the European Union on clearinghouse oversight; enhanced cybersecurity for critical market infrastructure; improved the resilience of major clearinghouses; and took many actions to ensure commercial businesses were not burdened by Dodd- Frank reforms.

Under his leadership, the agency declared virtual currencies to be commodities, brought enforcement actions against unregistered Bitcoin platforms and approved a Bitcoin swap.

Previously, Mr. Massad served as the Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability of the U.S. Department of the Treasury. In that capacity, he oversaw the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), the principal U.S. governmental response to the 2008 financial crisis. During his tenure, Treasury recovered more on all the crisis investments than was disbursed. Mr. Massad was with the Treasury from 2009 to 2014 and also served as a counselor to the Treasury Secretary.

Prior to his government service, Mr. Massad was a partner in the law firm of Cravath, Swaine & Moore, LLP. Mr. Massad had a broad corporate practice with a focus on corporate finance, financial markets and derivatives. His practice was heavily international. While resident primarily in New York over his 25 year career with the firm, he served as co-manager of the Hong Kong office for five years and also in the London office. He was

one of the principal lawyers that drafted the ISDA Master Agreement governing derivative transactions as well as the original User’s Guide. He also had an active pro bono practice, representing UNICEF and Covenant House, among others, for many years.

Mr. Massad has a J.D. from Harvard Law School and a B.A. from Harvard College. He currently lives in Washington, D.C. with his family.